Wednesday, January 14, 2009

How to Make Mexican Chorizo Recipe / Cómo Hacer Chorizo Mexicano

 Share on your social networks; it only takes 5 seconds. Thanks!! RECETA EN ESPAÑOL.
Chorizo5

After several years of looking for a good chorizo-selling Hispanic store, and having no luck, I decided to make them myself. It wasn't easy at the beginning. The idea of stuffing the meat into the casings seemed unattractive and messy. I started using a small funnel and then found a large one and cut the tip to make it easier to work it. Making your own chorizo might be a daunting task for some, but once you make it, you'll realize it was worth it. Besides you can make it into patties and freeze it, which lasts up to 6 months. The stuffing is much easier if you have a Kitchen Aid with the stuffer attachment.  


Chorizo can be cooked in a red salsa, scrambled with eggs, fried with cubed potatoes, cooked for tacos, added to Tinga Poblana, etc... it will spice up your plate. Enjoy the recipe.


Curing time: 1 day


This recipe yields 20 chorizos of about 3 inches.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs. of ground pork
  • 6 ounces of ground pork belly fat
  • 2 tablespoons of salt
  • 8 guajillo peppers
  • 6 ancho peppers
  • 1 cup of white vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons of paprika
  • 6 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/3 of a tablespoon of ground black pepper
  • ½ tablespoon of ground cumin
  • 3/4 tablespoon of Mexican oregano
  • ½ teaspoon of dry marjoram
  • ½ teaspoon of coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon of dry thyme
  • 6 cloves
  • ½ teaspoon ground allspice
  • Enough butcher's twine or corn husks to tie the chorizos
NOTES:



* At least one hour before starting to process the meat and pork fat, place them in the refrigerator. This will make the meat easier to handle.
* Do not skip the ground pork belly fat; it will help in the curing of the chorizo.
* I buy a small package of sausage casings online and it lasts to make up to 10 lbs. of meat.


Preparation:

1. Wipe the peppers clean. Remove stems and cut lengthwise. Remove seeds, and place in a bowl. Cover with hot water and let sit for 30 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, grind the species and dry herbs using a specie grinder.

3. Discard water and place the peppers in a blender. Add the vinegar and garlic cloves and puree until smooth; set aside.

4. Place the pork meat and fat in a large bowl. Add the ground mixture of herbs and spices. Mix well. Add the chili sauce and combine until well mixed.

NOTE: At this time you can fry a very small patty to taste the seasonings, and modify to your liking.

5. Place in your refrigerator for a day to season in a well covered glass container. This step will enhance the flavor.

6. After a day mix again the mixture and wrap it in small packages, it will freeze well for months. It can also be stuffed into casings.


How to stuff the chorizo into the casings:


1. Soak the casings in warm water until soft and pliable, at least 1 hour.

2. Run lukewarm water through the casings to remove any salt.


Casings for chorizo Casings for chorizo1
Below are the casings and corn husks strips after 1 hour of soaking in warm water, the funnel and the chorizo mixture.
chorizo3
3. Tie a double knot in one end of the casing, and then cut off a length of casing. Gather all but a couple of inches of the casing over the nozzle of the sausage stuffer or funnel.

4. Start pressing the sausage mixture through, supporting the casing with your other hand. Pack the sausage as tight as you can, but not to the point of bursting. When you have filled almost all the casing (or used up all the stuffing), slip the casing off the nozzle.

5. For a coil, tie the sausage where the stuffing ends.

Chorizo4 


6. Place the sausage on a clean table and start to make links.
7. Pinch the rope into links and twist in alternating directions at the indentations. Using butcher’s twine or corn husks tie the rope of sausage at intervals. 
    8. Randomly prick the casings with a thin toothpick or the tines of a fork to release any air that’s trapped.

    Chorizo3 


    9. Hang the chorizo for a day in a dry room free of dust or insects. If you wish cover with a cheese cloth. This step will help to cure the meat. Some of the vinegar will drip at this stage.


     chorioz6


    Now your chorizo is ready!! Cook, refrigerate, smoke or use your food saver if you plan to freeze it. 

    ¡Buen provecho!


    Mely  




    77 comments:

    1. Mely, te auguro mucho éxito con tu blog de cocina mexicana, te quedó muy bien tu primera entrada en el blog, muchos lectores se van a deleitar viendo y cocinando tus recetas. Muy pronto tendrás miles de visitantes. Un gran beso!

      ReplyDelete
    2. Gracias Nora,

      Sobretodo por animarme a hacerlo.

      Un abrazo!

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    3. Hola Mely...
      Muchas gracias por visitar mi blog y gracias tambien por invitarme al tuyo, me gusta mucho la comida mexicana.
      Estos choricitos tienen que estar buenisimos. Estupendos para una barbacoa.

      Poco a poco tendrás una recopilación estupenda.
      Prometo visitarte siempre que pueda.


      Muchos besos
      Hilda

      ReplyDelete
    4. Gracias Hilda,

      Seguire visitando tu blog ya que tienes ahi varias recetas que quiero cocinar.

      Saludos,

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    5. Thank you SO MUCH! I may be British, but I grew up in Los Angeles with a Mexican nanny, Jesusita! I loved chorizo and ate it constantly until I moved to the East Coast where I can only fine the cured Spanish kind. If I have to make it myself, I bloody well will! Thank you for making that possible!

      Dyanna

      ReplyDelete
    6. Hola Dyanna,

      If you lived close by I will share some chorizo with you. I just made a 6 month batch last week.

      If I ever visit up north maybe we could drop some by your place.

      Have some cooking.

      ReplyDelete
    7. Hello,

      Thank you for the recipe! Isn't 2 tablespoons salt a lot too much? I will try it with teaspoons and see what happens.

      Thanks again!
      Ethan

      ReplyDelete
    8. Hello Ethan,

      I love that name: Ethan.
      Yes, it is 2 Tablespoons, but you can always check the salt before placing the meat inside the casings by cooking a little portion of it in a skillet and also taste if the seasoning of herbs and spices are to your liking.

      Happy cooking and thank you for stopping by.

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    9. Hola,

      Quisiera saber si tienes la receta para solo 1 lb.
      Ya que en mi casa solo somos mi esposo y yo.. y 2 lb se me hace mucho para los dos..
      Otra pregunta.. es posible quitar la grasa.. para hacerlo uno poquito mas saludable.. jejej..

      saludos
      Bere

      ReplyDelete
    10. Hola Bere,

      Gracias por visitar el blog. Para hacer una libra de carne solo usa la mitad de los ingredientes, con respecto al sazon de las especias eso lo puedes ajustar a la hora de cocinar el chorizo si sientes que es muy poco la mitad de lo que dice la receta. Puedes evitar el uso de la grasa, solo asegurate de guardar el chorizo una vez hecho en el congelador y a la hora de cocinar le agregas un poco de aceite al sarten donde lo pienses guisar para evitar que se te pegue.

      Dos libras no es mucho chorizo, si te animas a hacer las dos libras solo guardalo en pequenas cantidades en el congelador y asi solo sacas lo que vayas consumiendo. El chorizo te dura hasta 6 meses en el congelador.

      Si tienes alguna otra duda por favor dejame saber.

      Saludos y que sigas cocinando rico!

      ReplyDelete
    11. Hola Mely,
      OMG! este "homemade" chorizo esta super rico! nada mas hize la mitad y me salio estupendo. Muchisimas gracias por compartir todas tus recetas, te lo agradezco de todo corazon.
      bye,
      Oyuki

      ReplyDelete
    12. Hola Oyuki,

      No sabes que gusto me da que te haya gustado. Guardalo en el congelador en porciones pequenas y te dura bastante tiempo. Ya sabes que lo puedes cocinar con huevo, papas, en salsa, en tortas, bueno tu has de saber mejor en que te gusta cocinarlo.

      Saludos y gracias por visitarme.

      ReplyDelete
    13. Recomiendo que lo que guarden en el condelador lo envuelban en aluminio. La carne se conserva bien y no sufre las quemadas del hielo cunado se deshiela. Y les durara mas tiempo en el congelador. Gracias por la receta.

      Oscar

      ReplyDelete
    14. Hola Oscar,

      Gracias por ese idea de usar el aluminio para proteger carne. Y gracias por pasar a visitar, espero verte pronto otra vez por aqui.

      ReplyDelete
    15. Hi,
      I tried your recipe (and actually I doubled it), and I'm somewhat surprised at the amount of vinegar, and the strong taste it leaves. The chorizo is good, but that darn vinegar taste subdues the peppers and other spices. Does that seem right to you? Did I do something wrong? Would doubling the recipe mean I should have used less vinegar?
      Thanks for the recipe, and thanks in advance for any thoughts you might have!

      ReplyDelete
    16. Hello kcrake,

      You know the same feeling happened to meet the first time I tried. I was sure I did something wrong.

      The vinegar will drip from the chorizo casings while hanging and during the next days, the chorizo will dry a little but the peppers and spices flavors will be there. If you didn't use the casings and have the chorizo in a container the vinegar will separated from the meat just drain it. It needs the vinegar to cure but will release it with the passing days even in the fridge unless you freeze it right away.

      I do hope this works for you, and thanks a lot for stopping by.

      Have a great day!

      ReplyDelete
    17. Hey kcrake,

      Just a question:

      Isn't that a lot of chorizo? When I make this recipe it last 6 months since we are a small family.

      ReplyDelete
    18. Yep, it was (is) a lot. I make sausage once or twice a month, and since my sausage stuffer holds 5 lbs, I tend to adjust recipes to make that much (or close, anyway). It just seems like with all the mess and cleanup involved, I might as well make enough to make it worth the time.

      I also tend to give some away to friends and neighbors.

      What you described about the vinegar is exactly what happened. It separated from the meat, and I poured it off. Still, I might try just a bit less next time I do this.

      Thanks again!
      KC

      ReplyDelete
    19. como le ago para sacar la receta en espanol

      ReplyDelete
    20. Visita el Blog de mi amiga Nora. Ahi esta publicada la receta en Espanol.

      http://gustausted.blogspot.com/2008/11/como-hacer-chorizo-en-casa-chorizo_30.html

      Espero sirva el enlace de el BLog "Gusta Usted" en la seccion de carne de puerco ahi la encuentras junto con muchas mas recetas ricas.

      Saludos!

      ReplyDelete
    21. Hola,

      I made the chorizo for the first time, it tastes just as I remember it.

      I can't thank you enough.

      Juan M.

      ReplyDelete
    22. I live in Greeley, CO. Does anybody know of a place where I can buy chorizo like you all are makin? I'm 70 years old and remember eating some real good tasting chorizo. Can't buy anything like it anymore.
      Thanks for any help!
      John

      ReplyDelete
    23. Hello John,

      I made some phone calls and this is what I found out in Greenley, CO. The Avanza Supermarket has a meat section "carniceria" and they sell chorizo made by their mexican employees. Since I have not taste it, I can't tell you if the flavor will be the one you are looking for but why don't you give them a try.

      This is the address:
      3635 W 10th St, Greeley, CO (Between 36 and 37)
      (970) 351-0727 ‎ 1.5 mi W

      I hope this helps.

      Saludos,

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    24. hola mely estoy fasinada pues no se como di con tu blog buscando una buena receta de como preparar un buen chorizo,casero y la verdad que lo prepare y me salio muy sabroso.gracias por tomar tu tienpo para conpartir esas buenas recetas con todos nosotros.un besoy abraso de tu nueva amiga mary saludos de aqui arlington,texas,va!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!by.

      ReplyDelete
    25. Hola Maria,

      Que gusot saber que te quedo sabroso el chorizo.

      Un abrazo para ti tambien y gracias por tu visita.

      Melt

      ReplyDelete
    26. so the chiles are dry? this sounds fabulous. I had chorizo once and I loved it. I bought some in the store but it was awful, very greasy and fatty. I was wondering about making it myself. And I could just make it into patties, instead of putting it in casings?

      ReplyDelete
    27. Hello Trish,

      Yes, you could make them into patties and freeze them.

      Saludos,

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    28. Hola Mely,
      Thank you for your recipe. I am not using the fat. Can we mix cooking oil in the meat before cooking? Or does it have to be in the pan?

      Thank you,
      Maria

      ReplyDelete
    29. Hola Maria,

      You can definitely add the oil until cooking time. The pork fat helps preserve the meat. If you are not using it try to keep the chorizos in the fridge as soon as you make the mixture of the meat with the spices.

      Thanks for stopping by and come back again.

      Happy cooking!

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    30. Thank you so very much, can't wait to try it!!!

      -Maria♥

      ReplyDelete
    31. Mely,
      I made it and it is delicious!!!!!
      Thank you so much!!!

      All the best,
      Maria♥

      ReplyDelete
    32. Hi! Maria,

      Thanks a lot for stopping by and letting me know. I like to know how a recipe turns for other cooks.

      Happy to know you like it.

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    33. omg you can make them yourself?? that's going to save me so much money! i'm definitely bookmarking this! thanks!

      http://mummyicancook.blogspot.com/2011/01/chorizo-and-chickpeas-in-paprika-tomato.html

      ReplyDelete
    34. Hi - I am really glad to discover this. great job!

      ReplyDelete
    35. Excelente receta! Que bueno que estas compartiendo el sabor Mexicano con todo el mundo.

      ReplyDelete
    36. Hola Mely!
      Gracias por la receta! Me choca ir a los mercados mexicanos para comprar chorizo de res. Muchos los venden con los desechos o con mucho gordo y nervio. Encontre un mercado, Henrys en San Diego, que es sabroso pero me queda lejos!

      ReplyDelete
    37. Hola Lyss,
      Se me hizo curioso saber hace tiempo que en California venden el chorizo con carne de res y molida mu finita. Cuando puedas ir a comprar el que te gusta de San Diego aprovecha a comprar suficiente para congelar.

      Y si algun dia te animas a hacerlo en casa esta receta no falla.

      Saludos y gracias por tu visita.

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    38. Hola Mountainnb,

      Mchisimas gracias por tomarte el tiempo de visitar la pagina y dejarnos tu amable comentario.


      Saludos donde quiera que estes.

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    39. Use apple vinager instead of the white vinager and you won't have that vinager taste

      ReplyDelete
    40. This recipe looks awsome!!! I love chorizo and certainly going to try this! I saw a Rick Bayless show a while back and his chorizo recipe seemed too simple and after I read yours, this certainly looks incredible and I'm sure it will be delish!!! I like my chorizo plain. I brown some onion with a LITTLE oil, add a few links of chorizo, brown it for a few min, then I add chunks of tomato and continue to cook it 'til done. You can make tacos, sopes, tostadas...you name it!!! I will keep you posted. Thanks again.
      Gustavo in Yorba Linda, CA

      ReplyDelete
    41. I LOVE YOUR RECEPE IT TESTE REAL GOOD AND THE INSTRUCTIONS WERE EASY TO FOLLOW

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Martha,

        I am so glad you like the recipe.

        Mely

        Delete
    42. I really want to try this, but have a question for you. I live in the Caribbean, and the thought of leaving the sausage out for a day in a non air conditioned house scares me.... will the chorizos be ok(food safety wise) if I do that? I know you cook the meat, but that just sounds scary.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Alexandra,

        I understand your concerns, the vinegar helps to cure the meat but you can just leaven them for some hours outside. Sometimes I just leave them for 4 hours and then keep them hanging in my kitchen.

        Delete
    43. I have a question, I don't eat pork. Can the same recipe be used with ground chuck? I've been looking everywhere around here & no one sells beef home made choriso only pork. ;(.
      Thanks.
      Sandy, from chicago

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Sandy,

        Yes, you can make it with beef if you want and also with chicken.
        I had tried the chicken chorizo and it really taste good.

        Saludos,

        Mely

        Delete
    44. Mely, do you have a recipe for green rice? Had some at someones house & was embarassed to asked for the recipe. ;)
      Thank you.
      Sandy, chicago.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Sandy D,

        I posted a recipe a while ago on my friend Nora's blog.
        Here is the link:

        http://www.gustausted.com/2008/12/arroz-verde-de-puebla-receta.html

        Provecho!

        Mely

        Delete
    45. Mely,
      Gracias el arroz salio super delicious! Lo ise con tilapia, ensalada y seasoned corn kernels.
      Gracias!!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Que bueno que te gusto Sandy.

        Sabes, volviendo al asunto de hacer el chorizo con carne de res, me acorde que en Tamaulipas y en San Luis Potosi venden chorizo de vibora cascabel. Solo una vez lo probe ya que una compañera de escuela lo comia para ayudarla a remediar su problema con el acne.

        Saludos,

        Mely

        Delete
      2. Wow! Aque sabe? Is it good?
        Saludos
        Sandy ;)

        Delete
      3. Hola Sandy,

        Solo recuerdo que sabia a chorizo sin ese saborcito que le da la grasa del puerco. Y como lo hacia revuelto con huevo, pues no se sentia mucho la diferencia.

        Saludos!

        Mely

        Delete
    46. Hola!
      Me gusta mucho este blog, muchas felicidades. Ya he hecho varias recetas y todas han salido muy ricas :)Yo soy de Monterrey y vivo en Canadá. Quiero hacer este chorizo pero no encuentro chile ancho. ¿Sabe alguien si lo puedo reemplazar con algo más, o de qué forma puedo hacer el chile ancho yo misma? Se me estaba ocurriendo que tal vez sea igual que hacer tomates deshidratados. Saludos!

      ReplyDelete
    47. Hola!
      Muchas felicidades por tu blog. Me gusta muchísimo! Yo soy de Monterrey y quiero hacer esta receta. Sin embargo, nunca he visto que vendan chiles anchos en donde vivo (en Vancouver). ¿Hay alguna sustitución para este ingrediente? Ojalá y si!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hola Diana,

        Que gusto que me esccribas. Mira para el chorizo puedes usar solo chile guajillo o tambien chile Nuevo Mexico. Y si de plano no encuntras ninguna usa pimenton-paprika. En Mexico hay carniceros que solo le ponen pimenton. El sabor no va a cambiar mucho.

        Espero luego me dejes saber como te quedo.

        Saludos,

        Mely

        Delete
    48. Making this with wild hog, and garden fresh jalapinos

      ReplyDelete
    49. 6 # of wild hog ham meat.1and a half pounds of commercial pork fat. And your recipe. Should be a on spot deal. Thanks for your help. I had to use 12 jalapinos ; as could not find the type of peppers in your recipe " the 8 " you mentioned.

      ReplyDelete
    50. Hello Tim,

      I am sure those chorizos will come great any way. In Mexico we also have green chorizo with a very different taste but still delicious. You can also use hot paprika powder or ancho pepper powder instead of the dry peppers.

      Please let me know the end results.

      Happy cooking!

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    51. I had all of your ingredients but the 8 peppers.

      ReplyDelete
    52. Authentic flavor. Little to no grease left in pan. Meat is still moist.

      THANK YOU!!!


      COLETTE AND TIM PARKER.



      NORTHWEST OKLAHOMA.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thanks for letting me know the outcome. Now other people that also have a hard time finding the dry peppers can experiment with jalapenos.

        Thank you Parker family.

        Delete
    53. Mely,

      just a couple of questions before I try this:

      From the directions of soaking the chiles in water I am assuming that I should use dreid chiles. Is this correct?

      I have seen a very similar recipe which calls for apple cider vinegar instead of white vinegar. Will this work, and will I need to adjust the drying/curing process?

      ReplyDelete
    54. Hello Stephen,

      This recipe use dry peppers. And you can used Apple cider vinegar, some people prefer it than white vinegar. The process for curing drying doesn't change.

      Enjoy!

      Mely

      ReplyDelete
    55. I would love to try this. I would like to make a ground turkey version. What kind of fat would I substitute? Do I have to cure it outside the reftigerator and if I don't, do I need to use the vinegar? Does this combo of spices taste just like the store bought ones (I live in Los Angeles). Thanks so much for sharing your authentic recipes!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Kristina,

        Is you are using store bought ground turkey meat, chances are it already has some fat from the same turkey. I know on must packages it says: lean Turkey meat, but the chorizo must have some form of fat to be preserved. And yes it also needs the vinegar, other wise it will turn rancid very quickly. Unless you freeze it right away, then it will last for a longer period of time.

        The curing time hanging the chorizos in a airy environment will help to release extra moisture and vinegar (there will be some drippings), plus it is essential to cure an add
        the characteristic flavor of a Mexican Chorizo.

        The mix of spices would give you a Chorizo that tastes just like the ones sold in Mexico.

        Happy Cooking,

        Mely

        Delete
    56. Saludos, Mely.

      Tengo una duda en la parte de "ground pork fat". En el blog de Nora (http://www.gustausted.com) esa parte fue traducida como "grasa de puerco (lardo) molida o picada finamente".

      Vivo en Mexico, no se mucho de cocina (apenas aprendiendo). No habia escuchado ese termino. Supongo que no es manteca de cerdo. Y "lard" tengo entendido que es la manteca vegetal hidrogenada (la que normalmente se usa para hacer tortillas de harina).

      Asi lo pediria en una carniceria? Como grasa de puerco? Es algo diferente a la manteca, verdad?

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hola Juan V.

        La grasa que indica la receta y que es necesaria para la conservacion del chorizo, yo uso la grasa que tiene el puerco pegada a la piel. Como se aprecia en la foto del enlace:

        http://www.johndellavecchia.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/DSC_1049.jpg


        En Estados Unidos, se le llama "lard" a la manteca de puerco, la que se produce al derretir la carne grasa del puerco como cuando hacemos carnitas o chicharrones. La que comunmente agregamos para hacer tamales o gorditas. Quizas por eso tradujeron la palabra "lard" como lardo. Pero esa no es la que necesitas, la que necesitas es como la que se aprecia en la foto del enlace de arriba.

        En caso de que no la encuentres compra carne de pierna de puerco molida gruesa ya que esa tiene mucha grasa ya revuelta.

        Espero te sirva la respuesta, por cualqueir otra duda no dudes en enviarme un correo.

        Saludos

        Mely

        Delete
    57. Que bonito blog! se me antojo todooooo!. Excelente guia para cocinar autentico!

      ReplyDelete
    58. Me ha gustado mucho tu receta. Yo habia buscado por todas las tiendas latinas chorizo de res, al fin encontre uno pero tenia un sabor raro tipo barbacoa! Hoy por fin me anime hacerlo, aunque me faltaron 2 especias me salio riquisimo.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hola Sayra,

        Que bueno que te gusto la receta. Y muchas gracias por tomarte el tiempo de pasar a dejar tu comentario sobre tus resultados.

        Saludos!

        Delete
    59. So excited to try this with venison. We are hunters and the season is near! P.S i am so addicted to your blog and my husband could not be more happy lol

      ReplyDelete
    60. Mely,
      I saw in one of your replies that you can use beef and chicken instead of pork to make this chorizo. What kind of fat would you use with these meats (especially the chicken)?
      Gracias,
      Eliseo

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hola Eliseo,

        Personally, I would add beef fat to the beef chorizo. And no fat to the chicken chorizo. Without the fat, you will need to use the chicken chorizo as soon as possible or store in the freezer. And add oil to cook it. Actually, this is called chori-pollo in some places. Are you planning to use the casings?

        Delete
      2. I wasn't planning to, as I always cook the story bought chorizo without the casing. Is there any benefit to the casing?

        Delete
      3. Hello Eliseo,

        The casing are useful if you are curing the chorizo, curing the chorizo will render a better flavor. But, to cure the chorizo you will need to add fat to the meat.

        Delete

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